26 March 2010

JIM MARSHALL : NOT Fade Away





Marshall showed me how to use a Nikon as weapon. He told me when something works stick with it. The 24mm lens he gave me in exchange for filing his negatives on saturdays changed the way I see. OH the memories!!! this photo kept recirculating on the screen saver last night...over and over...the last time I saw Marshall was in NYC with Dkish and Sarah... I walked past a gallery with his work in it and one day it was open. Dkish and I walked in and he was sitting there and said, "Hey Run, Run.." He invited us to dinner in an old jazz bar/restaraunt decorated with all his classic, black and white images glowing in dark light. Sarah kept asking him, Walter, what do you think about the Amazon rainforest? " We laughed all evening and all the way home...It was HILARIOUS.

in 1984 we met outside my dorm room and I asked him if he wanted to see my pictures. I didn't know his name. He knew of Running's work and told me I had to read Oliver LaFarge's "Laughing Boy". He gave me his card, and told me to call him if I needed any help. One time I did need to make some huge prints for a show and he invited us over to his house. Walking down the hall was a time warp into Music history. He had his printer print up my first homeboys series from the Mission. When I was moving to Puerto Rico and my apt was getting fumigated I needed a home in between Marshall offered a spot in his livingroom floor covered in a huge maze of his album collection.

Time has flown...I remember driving around with Marshall flying over the hills of San Francisco - Intense. Crazy. Him yelling about how you don't get any God Damn Access anymore... I was told Dennis Hopper modeled his photographer character in the movie " Apocalypse Now" after the multi camera wielding Marshall at Wood stock. He must have had 7, or 8 Leicas around his neck!! Living with Marshall in the Castro was sometimes crazy; We teased and likened him to a crazed Armenian Grandmother-" Take the fuckin' picture! " he loved to yell! He was on the edge and full of the fullness of life ; philosophical and crass. He LOVED the moment. Remembering it and showing the ones he caught. Jimmy Hendrix gave Marshall the Marshall LOgo off his Marshall amp...it sat on the kitchen table. We would look at contact sheets over strong coffee. if it was night, sometimes drink scotch. I got reconnected to my high school art teacher, Barb Vanderbeck because Marshall invited me to dinner and it so happened the maƮtre d' was her girlfriend. Years ago when he came to visit us in Flag we had one of the funniest dinners we ever shared with ms Heather and Bennett at the Cottage Place; our fingers in the desert tray after how many bottles of wine - dancing and taking pictures in the studio and calling Hauser .. Bennett and Marshall seeing whose nose profile was bigger...and who could balance a spoon off their noses the longest ?????? He would rant and call people 'assholes' straight up yet his portraits of people are illuminating; sensitive and open- when he shot his magic shown through. It was his 70 birthday just a couple years ago- that he has gone to the big backstage in the sky I try to imagine the reunion of spirits congregated to bring him on home... now I will have to find him as I look at the eyes of the people he loved in his photographs and hopes he rides on my shoulder really to click the moment off.

Yes there is magic reflected in some photographs and that is what photographers do -they connect us to it - and hopefully we are for the better because of it; Connect to the magic of the era of "A sunday morning coming down"...that lives on. Thank you Marshall for your magic and for always having faith in the Light of Beauty of it.

PLease salute and have a toast today to Marshall and play " Sunday Morning Going Down" in honor a GREAT photographer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_RLiuPRMJy8

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100325/ap_on_en_ot/us_obit_jim_marshall

WashingtonPost story:

A GREAT GALLERY LINK:
http://www.rollingstone.com/rockdaily/index.php/2010/03/24/remembering-jim-marshall-by-rolling-stone-editor-jason-fine/



Well I woke up Sunday morning,
With no way to hold my head that didn't hurt.
And the beer I had for breakfast wasn't bad,
So I had one more for dessert.
Then I fumbled through my closet for my clothes,
And found my cleanest dirty shirt.
An' I shaved my face and combed my hair,
An' stumbled down the stairs to meet the day.

I'd smoked my brain the night before,
On cigarettes and songs I'd been pickin'.
But I lit my first and watched a small kid,
Cussin' at a can that he was kicking.
Then I crossed the empty street,
'n caught the Sunday smell of someone fryin' chicken.
And it took me back to somethin',
That I'd lost somehow, somewhere along the way.

On the Sunday morning sidewalk,
Wishing, Lord, that I was stoned.
'Cos there's something in a Sunday,
Makes a body feel alone.
And there's nothin' short of dyin',
Half as lonesome as the sound,
On the sleepin' city sidewalks:
Sunday mornin' comin' down.

In the park I saw a daddy,
With a laughin' little girl who he was swingin'.
And I stopped beside a Sunday school,
And listened to the song they were singin'.
Then I headed back for home,
And somewhere far away a lonely bell was ringin'.
And it echoed through the canyons,
Like the disappearing dreams of yesterday.

On the Sunday morning sidewalk,
Wishing, Lord, that I was stoned.
'Cos there's something in a Sunday,
Makes a body feel alone.
And there's nothin' short of dyin',
Half as lonesome as the sound,
On the sleepin' city sidewalks:
Sunday mornin' comin' down.

Do do do do do do do do,
Do do do do do do do,
Do do do do do do do do,
Do do do do do do do.


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